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The Importance of Composiotn in Photography

Composition is what separates generic point-and - shoot photography from real planned and thought out photography.

Without knowing the best way to correctly compose a picture, you might have a $3,000 camera, but will still be taking bland photos. A camera is a tool, and no matter how simple or complicated a tool is, the effectiveness of this tool depends on the operator. For an illustration, let us use one of the simplest tools, a hammer. That pleasant shiny camera may be superb at reproducing your photo on an electronic or picture medium, but you might not be using the camera correctly, or 'hitting the nail on the head' so to speak.



The primary items to think about when composing a photo are your surroundings, your subject, and your placement. Before taking a picture, think about, 'What do I want to accomplish with this photo?'. There are two fundamental ways to try this; position your subjects, o-r position yourself.

One good technique to obtain a sense of exactly what a scene would seem like as an actual photograph is to make a frame from your hands and see the scene through this frame. This effectively gives you a feeling of border, and also blocks out things that might be otherwise distracting you from the actual scene at hand. Below is an example of this.

Seeing possible photos through a 'hand frame' can present you with a great feel for the outcome.

Subject


All good photographs begin with a topic. Before taking a picture, determine exactly what you want the principal subject o-r point of interest to be. Generally, the photo should be used in a way that makes the subject the very first thing that's seen in the photograph. Your theme should function as the primary point of focus and should be clear and crisp. Ideally, there ought to be nothing within the photograph that draws more attention in relation to the subject it-self. If, for example, as your subject you were to photograph a beach scene using a lighthouse, as well as a viewer is more attracted to a sandcastle to the beach, you have done a lousy job of making your subject clear.

Clearly, there may be, and numerous times are, multiple subjects in a single photo. In this situation, the goal would be to obtain harmony and balance between all matters. Do you want them both to be equally captivating, do you want one to pop as the others are somewhat more subtle? These are all questions which you have to address, and plan accordingly. When choosing a subject, do not consider the photo because the photographer, look at it as another photographer critiquing your work.


Framing
Frames can be essentially any item that encloses or surrounds your subject. This could be branches of near-by trees and on occasion even a solid frame like a cut out in a wall. Take note of your own surroundings, and keep a watch out for things that will make for an image-enhancing 'frame'. Take shape, texture, and colour in-to thought, frames which contrast sharply with the subject of your own photo can make for beautiful photos. As misuse can create cluttered or visually unappealing photographs, use frames with attention.

Balance
Obtaining the appropriate balance between your subject along with other details of the photo is extremely important. You don't want other parts of the picture distracting from your subject. Things that you must pay attention to are size, contrast, color, and symmetry. Generally speaking, asymmetrical photographs are somewhat more attractive than symmetrical photographs.

Rule of Thirds
The Rule of Thirds is really a photographic composition technique that most if not all sophisticated photographers utilize a great deal. The basis of this rule is that a picture is divided in to 9 equal sized segments, with 2 lines vertically and 2 lines horizontally. The four intersections of the lines are a great guidepoint for where your subject ought to be centered. This is likely one of the very most important compositional methods, as many photographers believe that a centered issue is not as intriguing (in many situations). The rule of thirds goes all the way back once again to 1845, as a rule for composing picturesque graphics where it originated.

Color and Contrast
A subject that is light may have a lot more impact when put against a dark background, but a dark subject against a light background could possibly be distracting. As there are several different scenarios that have different applications of this, the only means to get a feel for colours and contrast would be to experience it first hand.

Positioning
A picture might have the ability to improved many measures by only taking several steps forward or backward, or to one side, or by moving up or down. You may want to ponder on having the shot from a completely different angle, when you have great availability to the location. In still life shots, placing the subject can also work wonders.


Lines
Edges and lines of most types may be worked in to a picture to increase the effect. Diagonal lines are beautiful and visually satisfying and can have a large effect in your photo. Parallel lines and repeating lines can likewise have delightful effects. Lines which are leading to an object are normally more attractive in case you get that object in the shot.



For instance, should you be photographing a field enclosed by a wooden fence with flat lines, you might need to try to get a number of of the fence posts that the lines result in in the shot.


Sunday, 9-Jun-2013 07:00 Email | Share | | Bookmark
The Importance of Composiotn in Photography

Composition is what separates generic point-and - shoot photography from real planned and thought out photography.

Without knowing the best way to correctly compose a picture, you might have a $3,000 camera, but will still be taking bland photos. A camera is a tool, and no matter how simple or complicated a tool is, the effectiveness of this tool depends on the operator. For an illustration, let us use one of the simplest tools, a hammer. That pleasant shiny camera may be superb at reproducing your photo on an electronic or picture medium, but you might not be using the camera correctly, or 'hitting the nail on the head' so to speak.



The primary items to think about when composing a photo are your surroundings, your subject, and your placement. Before taking a picture, think about, 'What do I want to accomplish with this photo?'. There are two fundamental ways to try this; position your subjects, o-r position yourself.

One good technique to obtain a sense of exactly what a scene would seem like as an actual photograph is to make a frame from your hands and see the scene through this frame. This effectively gives you a feeling of border, and also blocks out things that might be otherwise distracting you from the actual scene at hand. Below is an example of this.



Seeing possible photos through a 'hand frame' can present you with a great feel for the outcome.

Subject
All good photographs begin with a topic. Before taking a picture, determine exactly what you want the principal subject o-r point of interest to be. Generally, the photo should be used in a way that makes the subject the very first thing that's seen in the photograph. Your theme should function as the primary point of focus and should be clear and crisp. Ideally, there ought to be nothing within the photograph that draws more attention in relation to the subject it-self. If, for example, as your subject you were to photograph a beach scene using a lighthouse, as well as a viewer is more attracted to a sandcastle to the beach, you have done a lousy job of making your subject clear.

Clearly, there may be, and numerous times are, multiple subjects in a single photo. In this situation, the goal would be to obtain harmony and balance between all matters. Do you want them both to be equally captivating, do you want one to pop as the others are somewhat more subtle? These are all questions which you have to address, and plan accordingly. When choosing a subject, do not consider the photo because the photographer, look at it as another photographer critiquing your work.


Framing
Frames can be essentially any item that encloses or surrounds your subject. This could be branches of near-by trees and on occasion even a solid frame like a cut out in a wall. Take note of your own surroundings, and keep a watch out for things that will make for an image-enhancing 'frame'. Take shape, texture, and colour in-to thought, frames which contrast sharply with the subject of your own photo can make for beautiful photos. As misuse can create cluttered or visually unappealing photographs, use frames with attention.

Balance
Obtaining the appropriate balance between your subject along with other details of the photo is extremely important. You don't want other parts of the picture distracting from your subject. Things that you must pay attention to are size, contrast, color, and symmetry. Generally speaking, asymmetrical photographs are somewhat more attractive than symmetrical photographs.

Rule of Thirds
The Rule of Thirds is really a photographic composition technique that most if not all sophisticated photographers utilize a great deal. The basis of this rule is that a picture is divided in to 9 equal sized segments, with 2 lines vertically and 2 lines horizontally. The four intersections of the lines are a great guidepoint for where your subject ought to be centered. This is likely one of the very most important compositional methods, as many photographers believe that a centered issue is not as intriguing (in many situations). The rule of thirds goes all the way back once again to 1845, as a rule for composing picturesque graphics where it originated.



Color and Contrast
A subject that is light may have a lot more impact when put against a dark background, but a dark subject against a light background could possibly be distracting. As there are several different scenarios that have different applications of this, the only means to get a feel for colours and contrast would be to experience it first hand.

Positioning
A picture might have the ability to improved many measures by only taking several steps forward or backward, or to one side, or by moving up or down. You may want to ponder on having the shot from a completely different angle, when you have great availability to the location. In still life shots, placing the subject can also work wonders.


Lines
Edges and lines of most types may be worked in to a picture to increase the effect. Diagonal lines are beautiful and visually satisfying and can have a large effect in your photo. Parallel lines and repeating lines can likewise have delightful effects. Lines which are leading to an object are normally more attractive in case you get that object in the shot.





For instance, should you be photographing a field enclosed by a wooden fence with flat lines, you might need to try to get a number of of the fence posts that the lines result in in the shot.


Sunday, 9-Jun-2013 07:00 Email | Share | | Bookmark
The Importance of Composiotn in Photography

Composition is what separates generic point-and - shoot photography from real planned and thought out photography.

Without knowing the best way to correctly compose a picture, you might have a $3,000 camera, but will still be taking bland photos. A camera is a tool, and no matter how simple or complicated a tool is, the effectiveness of this tool depends on the operator. For an illustration, let us use one of the simplest tools, a hammer. That pleasant shiny camera may be superb at reproducing your photo on an electronic or picture medium, but you might not be using the camera correctly, or 'hitting the nail on the head' so to speak.

The primary items to think about when composing a photo are your surroundings, your subject, and your placement. Before taking a picture, think about, 'What do I want to accomplish with this photo?'. There are two fundamental ways to try this; position your subjects, o-r position yourself.



One good technique to obtain a sense of exactly what a scene would seem like as an actual photograph is to make a frame from your hands and see the scene through this frame. This effectively gives you a feeling of border, and also blocks out things that might be otherwise distracting you from the actual scene at hand. Below is an example of this.

Seeing possible photos through a 'hand frame' can present you with a great feel for the outcome.

Subject
All good photographs begin with a topic. Before taking a picture, determine exactly what you want the principal subject o-r point of interest to be. Generally, the photo should be used in a way that makes the subject the very first thing that's seen in the photograph. Your theme should function as the primary point of focus and should be clear and crisp. Ideally, there ought to be nothing within the photograph that draws more attention in relation to the subject it-self. If, for example, as your subject you were to photograph a beach scene using a lighthouse, as well as a viewer is more attracted to a sandcastle to the beach, you have done a lousy job of making your subject clear.





Clearly, there may be, and numerous times are, multiple subjects in a single photo. In this situation, the goal would be to obtain harmony and balance between all matters. Do you want them both to be equally captivating, do you want one to pop as the others are somewhat more subtle? These are all questions which you have to address, and plan accordingly. When choosing a subject, do not consider the photo because the photographer, look at it as another photographer critiquing your work.


Framing
Frames can be essentially any item that encloses or surrounds your subject. This could be branches of near-by trees and on occasion even a solid frame like a cut out in a wall. Take note of your own surroundings, and keep a watch out for things that will make for an image-enhancing 'frame'. Take shape, texture, and colour in-to thought, frames which contrast sharply with the subject of your own photo can make for beautiful photos. As misuse can create cluttered or visually unappealing photographs, use frames with attention.

Balance
Obtaining the appropriate balance between your subject along with other details of the photo is extremely important. You don't want other parts of the picture distracting from your subject. Things that you must pay attention to are size, contrast, color, and symmetry. Generally speaking, asymmetrical photographs are somewhat more attractive than symmetrical photographs.

Rule of Thirds


The Rule of Thirds is really a photographic composition technique that most if not all sophisticated photographers utilize a great deal. The basis of this rule is that a picture is divided in to 9 equal sized segments, with 2 lines vertically and 2 lines horizontally. The four intersections of the lines are a great guidepoint for where your subject ought to be centered. This is likely one of the very most important compositional methods, as many photographers believe that a centered issue is not as intriguing (in many situations). The rule of thirds goes all the way back once again to 1845, as a rule for composing picturesque graphics where it originated.



Color and Contrast
A subject that is light may have a lot more impact when put against a dark background, but a dark subject against a light background could possibly be distracting. As there are several different scenarios that have different applications of this, the only means to get a feel for colours and contrast would be to experience it first hand.

Positioning
A picture might have the ability to improved many measures by only taking several steps forward or backward, or to one side, or by moving up or down. You may want to ponder on having the shot from a completely different angle, when you have great availability to the location. In still life shots, placing the subject can also work wonders.


Lines
Edges and lines of most types may be worked in to a picture to increase the effect. Diagonal lines are beautiful and visually satisfying and can have a large effect in your photo. Parallel lines and repeating lines can likewise have delightful effects. Lines which are leading to an object are normally more attractive in case you get that object in the shot.



For instance, should you be photographing a field enclosed by a wooden fence with flat lines, you might need to try to get a number of of the fence posts that the lines result in in the shot.


Saturday, 8-Jun-2013 12:16 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Tips for New Photographers

As a brand new photographer, these are some of the ideas that have helped get me going.

1. Don't go mad buying the most expensive gear immediately.
It's possible to get really nice photographs with a cheap point and shoot. See these examples on Flickr. The more pictures you take, the further you'll know by what sort of camera to get when it's time to upgrade.

2. Think about a tripod.
In the other hand, an inexpensive tripod is worth getting, especially in case you have shaky hands like mine. When I got a tripod, my satisfaction with my shots skyrocketed. For even more solidity, use your camera's timer function with a tripod (read our introduction to tripods).

3.
Photo ops often come when you least expect it. You might have the capacity to make the most of some of these unexpected opportunities - - if you're able to keep your gear relatively uncomplicated - - only a little camera-bag and a tripod.






4. Make a list of shots you had wished to get.
For those times you can't carry your camera around, keep a little notebook to jot down places you had wished another and photograph. Make sure to note any important details, like the light, in order to come back at precisely the same time or when the weather's correct. Should you not need to take a notebook, send your-self an e-mail using your mobile phone with Jott.com.

5. Don't overlook ordinary matters for photography.
You might not see anything interesting to photograph in your living room or your backyard, but try taking a look at familiar surroundings with fresh eyes. You could catch an interesting trick of-the mild or find some sudden wildflowers in your yard. Often a simple theme makes the best shot.

6. Love the learning process.
The best thing of having a hobby like photography is never running out of things to discover. Inspiration is all around you. Look at everything with the eyes of-a photographer and also you'll find opportunities you never noticed before.

7. Take advantage of free resources to learn.


Browse through Flickr or sites like the Digital Photography School Forum for inspiration and hints. If you are interested in learning about post processing, give free software like the GIMP a try.

8. Experiment with your camera's settings.
Than you know your point and shoot might be much more flexible and powerful. Read the guide for help deciphering all those little symbols. Try shooting your subjects with multiple options to learn what effects you like, as you explore. When you're taking a look at your photos on a computer, you can check the EXIF information (typically within the file's properties) to remember the settings you used.

9. Study the fundamental rules.
The quantity of information regarding photography online can be overwhelming. Start with a few articles on writing. Be available to what more seasoned photographers have to say about technique. You will need to understand the rules before you break them.

10. Take photographs consistently.
Try to photograph something every day. If you could not do that, make sure you remember to practice consistently, so you do not forget what you've learned. An excellent method to stimulate yourself is by doing the weekly assignments in the DPS Forum.

11. Don't be afraid to test.
The price of errors is free, in case you are with a digital camera. Go insane -- you might wind up with something you like. You'll certainly learn a lot in-the procedure.


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